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Bill Belichick, Patriots mutually agree to part ways after 24 seasons

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Bill Belichick, Patriots mutually agree to part ways after 24 seasons
Under Belichick, the Patriots experienced never-before-seen postseason success, going 30-12 in 19 postseason games. More postseason wins (30) than any other coach in NFL history.

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The six Super Bowl crowns hold the record for the most for any single NFL head coach.
Though he is regarded as the best coach of the modern age, Belichick’s three NFL Coach of the Year titles highlight a talent that is sometimes overlooked. While some teams experienced rapid ups and downs, the Patriots were one of the most respected groups for almost twenty years.

During his rule, he not only left a lasting impression on New England but the whole NFL, but he also introduced The Patriot Way to the league, an attitude that all other teams have failed miserably to adopt. He also celebrated triumphs with workmanlike exclamations of “No Days Off!” and held renowned gruff press conferences.

After reportedly writing his resignation on a napkin in front of an embarrassing news conference, Belichick notoriously spurned the New York Jets, setting off an odd start to his stint with the Patriots. After a deal for a first-round pick was eventually arranged, the Belichick era in New England started for the Jets and Patriots.

The Patriots finished with a 5-11 record in 2000, his first season. The franchise quickly rose to dynastic status after that.

Belichick’s most well-known decision came in Year 2, when he decided to stick with Tom Brady, the Patriots’ second-year quarterback, and he helped the team win its first Super Bowl. In Super Bowl XXXVI, Belichick’s defensive scheme against Marshall Faulk and “The Greatest Show On Turf” is remembered as one of the best in NFL history.

The Patriots were the last team to win the Lombardi Trophy in back-to-back Super Bowls in 2003 and 2004, propelled by a stifling Belichick defense and heroics from quarterback Rob Gronkowski.

During Belichick’s leadership, the Patriots underwent multiple transformations: from being a defensive-oriented team in the early going to an explosive offense during the Brady-Randy Moss seasons to a team that won three straight AFC Championships (2016–2018) with players like Rob Gronkowski and Julian Edelman.

From 2003 to 2019, the only year New England missed the playoffs was 2008, the year Brady hurt his knee in the first game of the season. Even with Matt Cassel starting, the Patriots managed to win 11 games in that season.

During the Patriots’ decades-long supremacy, controversy followed them both on and off the field, from Spygate to Deflategate. The Pats managed to win in spite of everything.

Postseason drama ruled at all of the highs and lows of the Belichick era. The first upset run to the championship, back-to-back Lombardis, a 16-0 regular season record that ended in a Super Bowl loss to the New York Giants, the second Big Blue loss, thrilling championship victories over the Seahawks and Falcons, and offensive guru Sean McVay’s mastery of defense in Super Bowl LIII were among the highlights.

With youngster Mac Jones starting at quarterback in 2021, Belichick helped the Patriots return to the postseason even after Brady left for Tampa Bay in 2020.

However, the coach’s and the de facto general manager’s situation reached a low point over the previous two years. The Pats were exposed after years of dubious coaching choices and draft selections. A talented attack was combusted by Jones’s failures (he was selected No. 15 overall in 2021), and a strong defense was unable to make up for it.

The 4-13 season that concluded Belichick’s tenure as coach was the poorest of his career, whether it was with Cleveland or New England. Prior to 2023, the Patriots had not lost 12-plus games in a season since 1992 (finished 2-14 in that season before they hired HOF Bill Parcells, Belichick’s mentor, as head coach in 1993).

In 2023, New England was a complete mess, finishing in the bottom five in every category. They tied for lowest place in the NFL with 13.9 points per game and a -11 turnover differential. The third-worst point total allowed by the Pats defense under Belichick was 21.5 points per game.

The conclusion of the Belichick era wasn’t beautiful, as most divorces do, but it reached its pinnacle and continued to rise for a much longer time than any NFL team in history.

The Super Bowls, the Hall of Fame players, the title parades, the sour pressers, and the beautifully articulate 10-minute monologues about long snapping will all be remembered by history. The Belichick dynasty in New England will live on in history as a legendary period. A dynasty that will serve as the benchmark for all others.

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