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Earthquake, Statue of Liberty lightning strike, and the solar eclipse. So…is the world ending?

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Earthquake, Statue of Liberty lightning strike, and the solar eclipse. So…is the world ending?
Google News Recentlyheard

Google News Recentlyheard

If I’m on trip, within the ocean, salty breeze in my frizzy hair, then sure, positive. I just like the bobbly feeling of being in the midst of a mushy wave.

However, once I’m sitting on a settee in the midst of my lounge, holding my 6-month-old niece, and the home begins shifting from below us? No thanks.

Like most East Coasters, I felt like Friday’s 4.8 magnitude earthquake got here out of nowhere. Along with higher meals and the actual change of seasons, maintaining our ft firmly planted on the bottom is among the causes we desire life right here over the sunshine and seismic exercise of the West Coast. We don’t do rattly, paintings-fall-off-the-wall earthquakes in Jersey.

Now that this out-of-the-ordinary factor has occurred, we’re completely consumed by it. I despatched and obtained extra texts than I need to admit buying and selling struggle tales concerning the 20-second rumble. I Googled, in order that I felt assured sufficient in my earthquake experience to carry conversations about it with family and friends. It’s what we talked about over dinner.

After which social media identified to me – because it so usually does – that this wild incidence isn’t alone. Right here’s a major-weird-stuff timeline for you:

Wednesday, April 3 – the Statue of Liberty is struck by lightning, and caught on digicam in gorgeous images by Dan Martland that make Girl Liberty appear like a pop star in the midst of a pyrotechnically enhanced present.

Friday, April 5 – The child and I, and about 42 million different folks, are actually sofa browsing throughout the quake.

Monday, April 8 – Get your glasses out, youngsters. It’s photo voltaic eclipse time.

Naturally, the web now thinks the world is ending.

I’ll admit I loved scrolling by means of all of the memes, witty feedback, and nasty spats on social media concerning the confluence of those occasions. I notably preferred the posters who predicted it was all “some subsequent stage Ghostbusters advertising technique,” or that the aliens are coming for us subsequent week.

They obtained me eager about why, when confronted with unusual (and fortunately in these circumstances not truly harmful) happenings, we instantly go to the tip of the world eventualities. All of us get the joke of the man who posted the Godzilla meme – in any case of this, what’s subsequent?!

I texted Brandon Valeriano, a Seton Corridor professor and all-around sensible man with a humorousness to ask his ideas. He identified to me that the three occasions I discussed weren’t actually as out-of-nowhere as they appear.

The Statue of Liberty, AccuWeather experiences, is definitely struck by lightning a number of occasions a yr.

Average earthquakes listed below are uncommon, however they do occur. We get small ones far more usually than you most likely understand. (We’ve had 28 quakes in New Jersey up to now 17 years.) And, one other stronger, 5.9 magnitude earthquake that hit Virginia in 2011 rattled us in New Jersey and New York, too.

And photo voltaic eclipses don’t occur on a regular basis, however they’re a traditional a part of the planetary rotation and are utterly predictable.

So why does X-formerly-Twitter say we’re in for it?

Professor Valeriano advised me we use humor and conspiracy theories to make sense of the world.

“People attempt to search for patterns to arrange … (the) world, and generally one thing that you simply see as a sample, or a streak, is admittedly simply one thing that’s occurring naturally.

“The world is huge and stuffed with complexity,” Valeriano texted me. “Loads of conspiracies are simply methods to ascertain order.”

So, he doesn’t assume we have to put together to be beamed up. That’s good.

However hey, I’ll nonetheless put on my pajamas inside out and hope for a Could Day snow day when you guys need to. (And really, it did snow in Could in New Jersey in 2020. However 2020 was means too out of the abnormal to rely.)

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